Let's Compare Worth and Worthwhile

Worth

Worth may refer to:

worth adj 1: having sufficient worth; "an idea worth considering"; "a cause deserving or meriting support"; "the deserving poor" (often used ironically) [syn: {deserving(p)}, {meriting(p)}, {worth(p)}] 2: having a specified value; "not worth his salt"; "worth her weight in gold" [syn: {worth(p)}] n 1: an indefinite quantity of something having a specified value; "10 dollars worth of gasoline" 2: the quality that renders something desirable or valuable or useful [ant: {worthlessness}] 3: French couturier (born in England) regarded as the founder of Parisian haute couture; noted for introducing the bustle (1825-1895) [syn: {Charles Frederick Worth}]

Worth \Worth\, n. [OE. worth, wur[thorn], AS. weor[eth], wur[eth]; weor[eth], wur[eth], adj. See {Worth}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. That quality of a thing which renders it valuable or useful; sum of valuable qualities which render anything useful and sought; value; hence, often, value as expressed in a standard, as money; equivalent in exchange; price. [1913 Webster] What 's worth in anything But so much money as 't will bring? --Hudibras. [1913 Webster] 2. Value in respect of moral or personal qualities; excellence; virtue; eminence; desert; merit; usefulness; as, a man or magistrate of great worth. [1913 Webster] To be of worth, and worthy estimation. --Shak. [1913 Webster] As none but she, who in that court did dwell, Could know such worth, or worth describe so well. --Waller. [1913 Webster] To think how modest worth neglected lies. --Shenstone. [1913 Webster] Syn: Desert; merit; excellence; price; rate. [1913 Webster]

Worth \Worth\, a. [OE. worth, wur[thorn], AS. weor[eth], wurE; akin to OFries. werth, OS. wer[eth], D. waard, OHG. werd, G. wert, werth, Icel. ver[eth]r, Sw. v["a]rd, Dan. v[ae]rd, Goth. wa['i]rps, and perhaps to E. wary. Cf. {Stalwart}, {Ware} an article of merchandise, {Worship}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Valuable; of worthy; estimable; also, worth while. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] It was not worth to make it wise. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. Equal in value to; furnishing an equivalent for; proper to be exchanged for. [1913 Webster] A ring he hath of mine worth forty ducats. --Shak. [1913 Webster] All our doings without charity are nothing worth. --Bk. of Com. Prayer. [1913 Webster] If your arguments produce no conviction, they are worth nothing to me. --Beattie. [1913 Webster] 3. Deserving of; -- in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. [1913 Webster] To reign is worth ambition, though in hell. --Milton. [1913 Webster] This is life indeed, life worth preserving. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 4. Having possessions equal to; having wealth or estate to the value of. [1913 Webster] At Geneva are merchants reckoned worth twenty hundred crowns. --Addison. [1913 Webster] {Worth while}, or {Worth the while}. See under {While}, n. [1913 Webster]

Worth \Worth\, v. i. [OE. worthen, wur[thorn]en, to become, AS. weor[eth]an; akin to OS. wer[eth]an, D. worden, G. werden, OHG. werdan, Icel. ver[eth]a, Sw. varda, Goth. wa['i]rpan, L. vertere to turn, Skr. v[.r]t, v. i., to turn, to roll, to become. [root]143. Cf. {Verse}, -{ward}, {Weird}.] To be; to become; to betide; -- now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc., are equivalent phrases. [1913 Webster] I counsel . . . to let the cat worthe. --Piers Plowman. [1913 Webster] He worth upon [got upon] his steed gray. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Worth, IL (village, FIPS 83518) Location: 41.68730 N, 87.79255 W Population (1990): 11208 (4500 housing units) Area: 6.2 sq km (land), 0.1 sq km (water) Zip code(s): 60482 Worth, MO (town, FIPS 81070) Location: 40.40550 N, 94.44684 W Population (1990): 103 (45 housing units) Area: 0.6 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water) Zip code(s): 64499

Worthwhile

Dobře placená procházka (English title: Worth While or A Well Paid Walk) is a Czech musical and film.

worthwhile adj : sufficiently valuable to justify the investment of time or interest; "a worthwhile book"

worthwhile \worthwhile\, adj. Worth the time or effort spent. See worth while. [1913 Webster] worthy. -- worthwhileness. --> [1913 Webster]

Worth \Worth\, a. [OE. worth, wur[thorn], AS. weor[eth], wurE; akin to OFries. werth, OS. wer[eth], D. waard, OHG. werd, G. wert, werth, Icel. ver[eth]r, Sw. v["a]rd, Dan. v[ae]rd, Goth. wa['i]rps, and perhaps to E. wary. Cf. {Stalwart}, {Ware} an article of merchandise, {Worship}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Valuable; of worthy; estimable; also, worth while. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] It was not worth to make it wise. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. Equal in value to; furnishing an equivalent for; proper to be exchanged for. [1913 Webster] A ring he hath of mine worth forty ducats. --Shak. [1913 Webster] All our doings without charity are nothing worth. --Bk. of Com. Prayer. [1913 Webster] If your arguments produce no conviction, they are worth nothing to me. --Beattie. [1913 Webster] 3. Deserving of; -- in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. [1913 Webster] To reign is worth ambition, though in hell. --Milton. [1913 Webster] This is life indeed, life worth preserving. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 4. Having possessions equal to; having wealth or estate to the value of. [1913 Webster] At Geneva are merchants reckoned worth twenty hundred crowns. --Addison. [1913 Webster] {Worth while}, or {Worth the while}. See under {While}, n. [1913 Webster]

While \While\, n. [AS. hw[=i]l; akin to OS. hw[=i]l, hw[=i]la, OFries. hw[=i]le, D. wigl, G. weile, OHG. w[=i]la, hw[=i]la, hw[=i]l, Icel. hv[=i]la a bed, hv[=i]ld rest, Sw. hvila, Dan. hvile, Goth. hweila a time, and probably to L. quietus quiet, and perhaps to Gr. ? the proper time of season. [root]20. Cf. {Quiet}, {Whilom}.] 1. Space of time, or continued duration, esp. when short; a time; as, one while we thought him innocent. ``All this while.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster] This mighty queen may no while endure. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] [Some guest that] hath outside his welcome while, And tells the jest without the smile. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] I will go forth and breathe the air a while. --Longfellow. [1913 Webster] 2. That which requires time; labor; pains. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Satan . . . cast him how he might quite her while. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {At whiles}, at times; at intervals. [1913 Webster] And so on us at whiles it falls, to claim Powers that we dread. --J. H. Newman. [1913 Webster] {The while}, {The whiles}, in or during the time that; meantime; while. --Tennyson. {Within a while}, in a short time; soon. {Worth while}, worth the time which it requires; worth the time and pains; hence, worth the expense; as, it is not always worth while for a man to prosecute for small debts. [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • worth: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • worth: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • worth: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • worth: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • worth: U.S. Gazetteer (1990)
  • worthwhile: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • worthwhile: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • worthwhile: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • worthwhile: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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