Let's Compare Prodigal and Profligate

Prodigal

Prodigal may refer to:

prodigal adj 1: very generous; "distributed gifts with a lavish hand"; "the critics were lavish in their praise"; "a munificent gift"; "his father gave him a half-dollar and his mother a quarter and he thought them munificent"; "prodigal praise"; "unsparing generosity"; "his unstinted devotion"; "called for unstinting aid to Britain" [syn: {lavish}, {munificent}, {overgenerous}, {too-generous}, {unsparing}, {unstinted}, {unstinting}] 2: recklessly wasteful; "prodigal in their expenditures" [syn: {extravagant}, {profligate}, {spendthrift}] 3: marked by rash extravagance; "led a prodigal life" n : a recklessly extravagant consumer [syn: {profligate}, {squanderer}]

Prodigal \Prod"i*gal\, a. [L. prodigus, from prodigere to drive forth, to squander away; pro forward, forth + agere to drive; cf. F. prodigue. See {Agent}. ] Given to extravagant expenditure; expending money or other things without necessity; recklessly or viciously profuse; lavish; wasteful; not frugal or economical; as, a prodigal man; the prodigal son; prodigal giving; prodigal expenses. [1913 Webster] In fighting fields [patriots] were prodigal of blood. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Syn: Profuse; lavish; extravagant; squandering; wasteful. See {Profuse}. [1913 Webster]

Prodigal \Prod"i*gal\, n. One who expends money extravagantly, viciously, or without necessity; one that is profuse or lavish in any expenditure; a waster; a spendthrift. ``Noble prodigals of life.'' --Trench. [1913 Webster]

Profligate

A spendthrift (also called profligate) is someone who spends money prodigiously and who is extravagant and recklessly wasteful, often to a point where the spending climbs well beyond his or her means.

profligate adj 1: recklessly wasteful; "prodigal in their expenditures" [syn: {extravagant}, {prodigal}, {spendthrift}] 2: unrestrained by convention or morality; "Congreve draws a debauched aristocratic society"; "deplorably dissipated and degraded"; "riotous living"; "fast women" [syn: {debauched}, {degenerate}, {degraded}, {dissipated}, {dissolute}, {libertine}, {riotous}, {fast}] n 1: a dissolute man in fashionable society [syn: {rake}, {rip}, {blood}, {roue}] 2: a recklessly extravagant consumer [syn: {prodigal}, {squanderer}]

Profligate \Prof"li*gate\, v. t. To drive away; to overcome. Note: [A Latinism] [Obs.] --Harvey. [1913 Webster]

Profligate \Prof"li*gate\, n. An abandoned person; one openly and shamelessly vicious; a dissolute person. ``Such a profligate as Antony.'' --Swift. [1913 Webster]

Profligate \Prof"li*gate\, a. [L. profligatus, p. p. of profligare to strike or dash to the ground, to destroy; pro before + a word akin to fligere to strike. See {Afflict}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Overthrown; beaten; conquered. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The foe is profligate, and run. --Hudibras. [1913 Webster] 2. Broken down in respect of rectitude, principle, virtue, or decency; openly and shamelessly immoral or vicious; dissolute; as, profligate man or wretch. [1913 Webster] A race more profligate than we. --Roscommon. [1913 Webster] Made prostitute and profligate muse. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Syn: Abandoned; corrupt; dissolute; vitiated; depraved; vicious; wicked. See {Abandoned}. [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • prodigal: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • prodigal: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • prodigal: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • profligate: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • profligate: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • profligate: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • profligate: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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