Pier and Wharf

Pier

A pier is a raised structure, including bridge and building supports and walkways, typically supported by widely spread piles or pillars.

pier n 1: a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats [syn: {wharf}, {wharfage}, {dock}] 2: (architecture) a vertical supporting structure (as a portion of wall between two doors or windows) 3: a support for two adjacent bridge spans

92 Moby Thesaurus words for "pier": abutment, anchorage, anchorage ground, arc-boutant, arcade, atlas, baluster, balustrade, banister, bank, base, basin, beam, berth, breakwater, bulkhead, bulwark, buttress, buttress pier, buttressing, caryatid, colonnade, colonnette, column, dado, die, dock, dockage, dockyard, dry dock, embankment, flying buttress, footstalk, groin, hanging buttress, harbor, harborage, haven, jack, jetty, jutty, landing, landing place, landing stage, levee, marina, mole, moorings, newel-post, pedestal, pedicel, peduncle, peristyle, pier buttress, pilaster, pile, piling, pillar, plinth, pole, port, portico, post, protected anchorage, quay, queen-post, rampart, retaining wall, road, roads, roadstead, seaport, seawall, shaft, shipyard, shoulder, slip, socle, staff, stalk, stanchion, stand, standard, stem, subbase, support, surbase, telamon, trunk, upright, wharf, wharfage

Pier \Pier\, n. [OE. pere, OF. piere a stone, F. pierre, fr. L. petra, Gr. ?. Cf. {Petrify}.] 1. (Arch.) (a) Any detached mass of masonry, whether insulated or supporting one side of an arch or lintel, as of a bridge; the piece of wall between two openings. (b) Any additional or auxiliary mass of masonry used to stiffen a wall. See {Buttress}. [1913 Webster] 2. A projecting wharf or landing place. [1913 Webster] {Abutment pier}, the pier of a bridge next the shore; a pier which by its strength and stability resists the thrust of an arch. {Pier glass}, a mirror, of high and narrow shape, to be put up between windows. {Pier table}, a table made to stand between windows. [1913 Webster]

Wharf

A wharf or quay (, US also or ) is a structure on the shore of a harbor or on the bank of a river or canal where ships may dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.

wharf n : a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats [syn: {pier}, {wharfage}, {dock}] v 1: provide with a wharf; "Wharf the mouth of the river" 2: store on a wharf; "Wharf the merchandise" 3: discharge at a wharf; "wharf the passengers" 4: come into or dock at a wharf; "the big ship wharfed in the evening" [syn: {moor}, {berth}] 5: moor at a wharf; "The ship was wharfed" [also: {wharves} (pl)]

35 Moby Thesaurus words for "wharf": anchorage, anchorage ground, basin, berth, breakwater, bulkhead, dock, dockage, dockyard, dry dock, embankment, groin, harbor, harborage, haven, jetty, jutty, landing, landing place, landing stage, levee, marina, mole, moorings, pier, port, protected anchorage, quay, road, roads, roadstead, seaport, seawall, shipyard, slip

Wharf \Wharf\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wharfed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wharfing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To guard or secure by a firm wall of timber or stone constructed like a wharf; to furnish with a wharf or wharfs. [1913 Webster] 2. To place upon a wharf; to bring to a wharf. [1913 Webster]

Wharf \Wharf\, n.; pl. {Wharfs}or {Wharves}. [AS. hwerf, hwearf, a returning, a change, from hweorfan to turn, turn about, go about; akin to D. werf a wharf, G. werft, Sw. varf a shipbuilder's yard, Dan. verft wharf, dockyard, G. werben to enlist, to engage, woo, OHG. werban to turn about, go about, be active or occupied, Icel. hverfa to turn, Goth. hwa['i]rban, hwarb[=o]n, to walk. Cf. {Whirl}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A structure or platform of timber, masonry, iron, earth, or other material, built on the shore of a harbor, river, canal, or the like, and usually extending from the shore to deep water, so that vessels may lie close alongside to receive and discharge cargo, passengers, etc.; a quay; a pier. [1913 Webster] Commerce pushes its wharves into the sea. --Bancroft. [1913 Webster] Out upon the wharfs they came, Knight and burgher, lord and dame. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] Note: The plural of this word is generally written wharves in the United States, and wharfs in England; but many recent English writers use wharves. [1913 Webster] 2. [AS. hwearf.] The bank of a river, or the shore of the sea. [Obs.] ``The fat weed that roots itself in ease on Lethe wharf.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster] {Wharf boat}, a kind of boat moored at the bank of a river, and used for a wharf, in places where the height of the water is so variable that a fixed wharf would be useless. [U. S.] --Bartlett. {Wharf rat}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The common brown rat. (b) A neglected boy who lives around the wharfs. [Slang] [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • pier: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • pier: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • pier: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • wharf: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • wharf: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • wharf: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • wharf: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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