Lease and Rent

Lease

A lease is a contractual arrangement calling for the (user) to pay the lessor (owner) for use of an asset.

lease n 1: property that is leased or rented out or let [syn: {rental}, {letting}] 2: a contract granting use or occupation of property during a specified time for a specified payment 3: the period of time during which a contract conveying property to a person is in effect [syn: {term of a contract}] v 1: let for money; "We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad" [syn: {rent}] 2: hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services [syn: {rent}, {hire}, {charter}] 3: grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" [syn: {let}, {rent}] 4: engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" [syn: {rent}, {hire}, {charter}, {engage}, {take}]

101 Moby Thesaurus words for "lease": adverse possession, alodium, bareboat charter, burgage, charter, claim, colony, copyhold, de facto, de jure, dependency, derivative title, equitable estate, estate at sufferance, estate for life, estate for years, estate in expectancy, estate in fee, estate in possession, estate tail, farm, farm out, fee, fee fief, fee position, fee simple, fee simple absolute, fee simple conditional, fee simple defeasible, fee simple determinable, fee tail, feod, feodum, feud, feudal estate, fief, fiefdom, frankalmoign, free socage, freehold, gavelkind, having title to, hire, hire out, hiring, hold, holding, job, knight service, lay fee, lease out, lease-back, lease-lend, leasehold, legal claim, legal estate, legal possession, lend-lease, let, let off, let out, mandate, occupancy, occupation, original title, owning, paramount estate, particular estate, possessing, possession, preoccupancy, preoccupation, prepossession, prescription, property, property rights, proprietary rights, remainder, rent, rent out, rental, reversion, seisin, socage, squatting, sublease, sublet, subrent, tenancy, tenantry, tenure, tenure in chivalry, title, underlease, underlet, undertenancy, usucapion, vested estate, villein socage, villeinhold, villenage

Record \Re*cord"\ (r?*k?rd"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Recorded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Recording}.] [OE. recorden to repeat, remind, F. recorder, fr. L. recordari to remember; pref. re- re- + cor, cordis, the heart or mind. See {Cordial}, {Heart}.] 1. To recall to mind; to recollect; to remember; to meditate. [Obs.] ``I it you record.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. To repeat; to recite; to sing or play. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] They longed to see the day, to hear the lark Record her hymns, and chant her carols blest. --Fairfax. [1913 Webster] 3. To preserve the memory of, by committing to writing, to printing, to inscription, or the like; to make note of; to write or enter in a book or on parchment, for the purpose of preserving authentic evidence of; to register; to enroll; as, to record the proceedings of a court; to record historical events. [1913 Webster] Those things that are recorded of him . . . are written in the chronicles of the kings. --1 Esd. i. 42. [1913 Webster] {To record a deed}, {mortgage}, {lease}, etc., to have a copy of the same entered in the records of the office designated by law, for the information of the public. [1913 Webster]

Lease \Lease\ (l[=e]s), n. [Cf. OF. lais. See {Lease}, v. t.] 1. The temporary transfer of a possession to another person in return for a fee or other valuable consideration paid for the transfer; especially, A demise or letting of lands, tenements, or hereditaments to another for life, for a term of years, or at will, or for any less interest than that which the lessor has in the property, usually for a specified rent or compensation. [1913 Webster] 2. The contract for such letting. [1913 Webster] 3. Any tenure by grant or permission; the time for which such a tenure holds good; allotted time. [1913 Webster] Our high-placed Macbeth Shall live the lease of nature. --Shak. [1913 Webster] {Lease and release} a mode of conveyance of freehold estates, formerly common in England and in New York. its place is now supplied by a simple deed of grant. --Burrill. --Warren's Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

Lease \Lease\ (l[=e]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Leased}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Leasing}.] [F. laisser, OF. laissier, lessier, to leave, transmit, L. laxare to loose, slacken, from laxus loose, wide. See {Lax}, and cf. {Lesser}.] 1. To grant to another by lease the possession of, as of lands, tenements, and hereditaments; to let; to demise; as, a landowner leases a farm to a tenant; -- sometimes with out. [1913 Webster] There were some [houses] that were leased out for three lives. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. To hold under a lease; to take lease of; as, a tenant leases his land from the owner. [1913 Webster]

Lease \Lease\ (l[=e]z), v. i. [AS. lesan to gather; akin to D. lezen to gather, read, G. lesen, Goth. lisan to gather; cf. Lith lesti to peck.] To gather what harvesters have left behind; to glean. [Obs.] --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Rent

Rent-to-own, also known as rental-purchase, is a type of legally documented transaction under which tangible property, such as furniture, consumer electronics and home appliances, is leased in exchange for a weekly or monthly payment, with the option to purchase at some point during the agreement.

rent See {rend}

rend v : tear or be torn violently; "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"; "pull the cooked chicken into strips" [syn: {rip}, {rive}, {pull}] [also: {rent}]

rent n 1: a regular payment by a tenant to a landlord for use of some property 2: an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants"; "she had snags in her stockings" [syn: {rip}, {snag}, {split}, {tear}] 3: the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions [syn: {economic rent}] 4: the act of rending or ripping or splitting something; "he gave the envelope a vigorous rip" [syn: {rip}, {split}] v 1: let for money; "We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad" [syn: {lease}] 2: grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners" [syn: {lease}, {let}] 3: engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" [syn: {lease}, {hire}, {charter}, {engage}, {take}] 4: hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services [syn: {hire}, {charter}, {lease}]

217 Moby Thesaurus words for "rent": abrasion, abysm, abyss, aggravated, arroyo, bareboat charter, blemish, box canyon, breach, break, breakage, broach, broken, burn, burned, burst, busted, canyon, cavity, chafe, chap, charter, chasm, check, checked, chimney, chink, chinky, chip, chipped, cleave, cleft, cleuch, clough, cloven, col, concussion, coulee, couloir, crack, cracked, crackle, cranny, craze, crazed, crevasse, crevice, cut, cut apart, cut open, cwm, damaged, defile, dehiscent, dell, deteriorated, dike, dispart, ditch, divaricate, divide, donga, draw, embittered, exacerbated, excavation, farm, farm out, fault, fee, fissure, fissured, fissury, flash burn, flaw, flume, fly open, fracture, fray, frazzle, furrow, gall, gap, gape, gaping, gappy, gash, gorge, groove, gulch, gulf, gully, harmed, hire, hire out, hiring, hole, hurt, impaired, imperfect, in bits, in pieces, in shards, in shreds, incise, incision, injured, injury, irritated, job, joint, kloof, lacerate, lacerated, laceration, lay open, leak, lease, lease out, lease-back, lease-lend, lend-lease, lesion, let, let off, let out, mangled, moat, mortal wound, mutilated, mutilation, notch, nullah, ope, open, open up, opening, part, pass, passage, puncture, quartered, quitrent, rack rent, ragged, ravine, rent charge, rent out, rent-roll, rental, rift, rime, rimose, rimulose, rip, rive, riven, run, rupture, ruptured, scald, scalded, scale, schism, scissure, scorch, scorched, scrape, scratch, scuff, seam, second-degree burn, separate, severed, shattered, shredded, slash, slashed, slice, slit, slot, smashed, sore, splinter, splintered, split, spread, spread out, spring open, sprung, stab, stab wound, sublease, sublet, subrent, swing open, tap, tattered, tear, tear open, the worse for, third-degree burn, throw open, torn, trauma, trench, underlet, valley, void, wadi, weakened, worse, worse off, worsened, wound, wounds immedicable, wrench

Rent \Rent\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rented}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Renting}.] [F. renter. See {Rent}, n.] 1. To grant the possession and enjoyment of, for a rent; to lease; as, the owwner of an estate or house rents it. [1913 Webster] 2. To take and hold under an agreement to pay rent; as, the tennant rents an estate of the owner. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\, v. i. To be leased, or let for rent; as, an estate rents for five hundred dollars a year. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), n. [From {Rend}.] 1. An opening made by rending; a break or breach made by force; a tear. [1913 Webster] See what a rent the envious Casca made. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Figuratively, a schism; a rupture of harmony; a separation; as, a rent in the church. [1913 Webster] Syn: Fissure; breach; disrupture; rupture; tear; dilaceration; break; fracture. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), imp. & p. p. of {Rend}. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), v. i. To rant. [R. & Obs.] --Hudibras. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), n. [F. rente, LL. renta, fr. L. reddita, fem. sing. or neut. pl. of redditus, p. p. of reddere to give back, pay. See {Render}.] 1. Income; revenue. See {Catel}. [Obs.] ``Catel had they enough and rent.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] [Bacchus] a waster was and all his rent In wine and bordel he dispent. --Gower. [1913 Webster] So bought an annual rent or two, And liv'd, just as you see I do. --Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. Pay; reward; share; toll. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Death, that taketh of high and low his rent. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 3. (Law) A certain periodical profit, whether in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc. [1913 Webster] Note: The term rent is also popularly applied to compensation for the use of certain personal chattels, as a piano, a sewing machine, etc. [1913 Webster] 4. (Polit. Econ.) (a) That portion of the produce of the earth paid to the landlord for the use of the ``original and indestructible powers of the soil;'' the excess of the return from a given piece of cultivated land over that from land of equal area at the ``margin of cultivation.'' Called also {economic rent}, or {Ricardian rent}. Economic rent is due partly to differences of productivity, but chiefly to advantages of location; it is equivalent to ordinary or commercial rent less interest on improvements, and nearly equivalent to ground rent. (b) Loosely, a return or profit from a differential advantage for production, as in case of income or earnings due to rare natural gifts creating a natural monopoly. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] {Black rent}. See {Blackmail}, 3. {Forehand rent}, rent which is paid in advance; foregift. {Rent arrear}, rent in arrears; unpaid rent. --Blackstone. {Rent charge} (Law), a rent reserved on a conveyance of land in fee simple, or granted out of lands by deed; -- so called because, by a covenant or clause in the deed of conveyance, the land is charged with a distress for the payment of it. --Bouvier. {Rent roll}, a list or account of rents or income; a rental. {Rent seck} (Law), a rent reserved by deed, but without any clause of distress; barren rent. A power of distress was made incident to rent seck by Statute 4 George II. c. 28. {Rent service} (Eng. Law), rent reserved out of land held by fealty or other corporeal service; -- so called from such service being incident to it. {White rent}, a quitrent when paid in silver; -- opposed to black rent. [1913 Webster]

Rent \Rent\ (r[e^]nt), v. t. To tear. See {Rend}. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Rend \Rend\ (r[e^]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rent} (r[e^]nt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Rending}.] [AS. rendan, hrendan; cf. OFries. renda, randa, Fries. renne to cut, rend, Icel. hrinda to push, thrust, AS. hrindan; or cf. Icel. r[ae]na to rob, plunder, Ir. rannaim to divide, share, part, W. rhanu, Armor. ranna.] 1. To separate into parts with force or sudden violence; to tear asunder; to split; to burst; as, powder rends a rock in blasting; lightning rends an oak. [1913 Webster] The dreadful thunder Doth rend the region. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To part or tear off forcibly; to take away by force. [1913 Webster] An empire from its old foundations rent. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] I will surely rend the kingdom from thee. --1 Kings xi. 11. [1913 Webster] {To rap and rend}. See under {Rap}, v. t., to snatch. [1913 Webster] Syn: To tear; burst; break; rupture; lacerate; fracture; crack; split. [1913 Webster]

Rent (Isa. 3:24), probably a rope, as rendered in the LXX. and Vulgate and Revised Version, or as some prefer interpreting the phrase, "girdle and robe are torn [i.e., are 'a rent'] by the hand of violence."

Data Sources:

  • lease: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • lease: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • lease: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • lease: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • lease: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • lease: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • rent: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • rent: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • rent: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • rent: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary

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