Larceny and Theft

Larceny

Larceny is a crime involving the wrongful acquisition of the personal property of another person. It was an offence under the common law of England and became an offence in jurisdictions which incorporated the common law of England into their own law.

larceny n : the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International" [syn: {theft}, {thievery}, {thieving}, {stealing}]

Larceny \Lar"ce*ny\, n.; pl. {Larcenies}. [F. larcin, OE. larrecin, L. latrocinium, fr. latro robber, mercenary, hired servant; cf. Gr. (?) hired servant. Cf. {Latrociny}.] (Law) The unlawful taking and carrying away of things personal with intent to deprive the right owner of the same; theft. Cf. {Embezzlement}. [1913 Webster] {Grand larceny} & {Petit larceny are} distinctions having reference to the nature or value of the property stolen. They are abolished in England. {Mixed larceny}, or {Compound larceny}, that which, under statute, includes in it the aggravation of a taking from a building or the person. {Simple larceny}, that which is not accompanied with any aggravating circumstances. [1913 Webster]

Theft

In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it.

theft n : the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International" [syn: {larceny}, {thievery}, {thieving}, {stealing}]

39 Moby Thesaurus words for "theft": acquisition, appropriation, boosting, burglary, caper, claiming, embezzlement, filch, filching, grab, heist, hijacking, job, larceny, lift, lifting, pilferage, pilfering, pinch, pinching, possession, purloining, reception, rip-off, robbery, robbing, score, shoplifting, snitching, steal, stealage, stealing, swiping, taking, taking away, taking possession, thievery, thieving, touch

Theft \Theft\, n. [OE. thefte, AS. [thorn]i['e]f[eth]e, [thorn][=y]f[eth]e, [thorn]e['o]f[eth]e. See {Thief}.] 1. (Law) The act of stealing; specifically, the felonious taking and removing of personal property, with an intent to deprive the rightful owner of the same; larceny. [1913 Webster] Note: To constitute theft there must be a taking without the owner's consent, and it must be unlawful or felonious; every part of the property stolen must be removed, however slightly, from its former position; and it must be, at least momentarily, in the complete possession of the thief. See {Larceny}, and the Note under {Robbery}. [1913 Webster] 2. The thing stolen. [R.] [1913 Webster] If the theft be certainly found in his hand alive, . . . he shall restore double. --Ex. xxii. 4. [1913 Webster]

Theft Punished by restitution, the proportions of which are noted in 2 Sam. 12:6. If the thief could not pay the fine, he was to be sold to a Hebrew master till he could pay (Ex. 22:1-4). A night-thief might be smitten till he died, and there would be no blood-guiltiness for him (22:2). A man-stealer was to be put to death (21:16). All theft is forbidden (Ex. 20:15; 21:16; Lev. 19:11; Deut. 5:19; 24:7; Ps. 50:18; Zech. 5:3; Matt. 19:18; Rom. 13:9; Eph. 4:28; 1 Pet. 4:15).

Data Sources:

  • larceny: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • larceny: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • theft: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • theft: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • theft: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • theft: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary

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