Hades and Pluto

Hades

Hades (; from ancient Greek , Hādēs) was the ancient Greek god of the underworld. Eventually, the god's name came to designate the abode of the dead.

Hades n 1: (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythology; brother of Zeus and husband of Persephone [syn: {Pluto}, {Aides}, {Aidoneus}] 2: (religion) the world of the dead; "he didn't want to go to hell when he died" [syn: {Hel}, {Hell}, {infernal region}, {netherworld}, {Scheol}, {underworld}]

112 Moby Thesaurus words for "Hades": Abaddon, Acheron, Agdistis, Aides, Aidoneus, Amenti, Amor, Aphrodite, Apollo, Apollon, Aralu, Ares, Artemis, Ate, Athena, Bacchus, Cerberus, Ceres, Charon, Cora, Cronus, Cupid, Cybele, Demeter, Despoina, Diana, Dionysus, Dis, Dis pater, Erebus, Eros, Gaea, Gaia, Ge, Gehenna, Great Mother, Hel, Helios, Hephaestus, Hera, Here, Hermes, Hestia, Hymen, Hyperion, Jove, Juno, Jupiter, Jupiter Fidius, Jupiter Fulgur, Jupiter Optimus Maximus, Jupiter Pluvius, Jupiter Tonans, Kore, Kronos, Loki, Magna Mater, Mars, Mercury, Minerva, Minos, Mithras, Momus, Naraka, Neptune, Niflheim, Niflhel, Nike, Olympians, Olympic gods, Ops, Orcus, Osiris, Pandemonium, Persephassa, Persephone, Phoebus, Phoebus Apollo, Pluto, Poseidon, Proserpina, Proserpine, Rhadamanthus, Rhea, Satan, Saturn, Sheol, Tartarus, Tellus, Tophet, Venus, Vesta, Vulcan, Zeus, avichi, hell, infernal regions, inferno, jahannan, limbo, lower world, nether world, perdition, pit of Acheron, place of torment, purgatory, shades below, the abyss, the bottomless pit, the grave, the pit, underworld

Tartarus \Tar"ta*rus\ (t[aum]r"t[.a]*r[u^]s), prop. n. [L., from Gr. Ta`rtaros.] (Class. Myth.) The infernal regions, described in the Iliad as situated as far below Hades as heaven is above the earth, and by later writers as the place of punishment for the spirits of the wicked. By the later poets, also, the name is often used synonymously with {Hades}, or the Lower World in general. [1913 Webster]

Hades \Ha"des\ (h[=a]"d[=e]z), n. [Gr. "a',dhs, "A'idhs; 'a priv. + 'idei^n to see. Cf. {Un-}, {Wit}.] The nether world (according to classical mythology, the abode of the shades, ruled over by Hades or Pluto); the invisible world; the grave. [1913 Webster] And death and Hades gave up the dead which were in them. --Rev. xx. 13 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster] Neither was he left in Hades, nor did his flesh see corruption. --Acts ii. 31 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster] And in Hades he lifted up his eyes, being in torments. --Luke xvi. 23 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster]

Hades that which is out of sight, a Greek word used to denote the state or place of the dead. All the dead alike go into this place. To be buried, to go down to the grave, to descend into hades, are equivalent expressions. In the LXX. this word is the usual rendering of the Hebrew sheol, the common receptacle of the departed (Gen. 42:38; Ps. 139:8; Hos. 13:14; Isa. 14:9). This term is of comparatively rare occurrence in the Greek New Testament. Our Lord speaks of Capernaum as being "brought down to hell" (hades), i.e., simply to the lowest debasement, (Matt. 11:23). It is contemplated as a kind of kingdom which could never overturn the foundation of Christ's kingdom (16:18), i.e., Christ's church can never die. In Luke 16:23 it is most distinctly associated with the doom and misery of the lost. In Acts 2:27-31 Peter quotes the LXX. version of Ps. 16:8-11, plainly for the purpose of proving our Lord's resurrection from the dead. David was left in the place of the dead, and his body saw corruption. Not so with Christ. According to ancient prophecy (Ps. 30:3) he was recalled to life.

HADES, n. The lower world; the residence of departed spirits; the place where the dead live. Among the ancients the idea of Hades was not synonymous with our Hell, many of the most respectable men of antiquity residing there in a very comfortable kind of way. Indeed, the Elysian Fields themselves were a part of Hades, though they have since been removed to Paris. When the Jacobean version of the New Testament was in process of evolution the pious and learned men engaged in the work insisted by a majority vote on translating the Greek word "Aides" as "Hell"; but a conscientious minority member secretly possessed himself of the record and struck out the objectional word wherever he could find it. At the next meeting, the Bishop of Salisbury, looking over the work, suddenly sprang to his feet and said with considerable excitement: "Gentlemen, somebody has been razing 'Hell' here!" Years afterward the good prelate's death was made sweet by the reflection that he had been the means (under Providence) of making an important, serviceable and immortal addition to the phraseology of the English tongue.

Pluto

Pluto, formal designation 134340 Pluto, is the second-most-massive known dwarf planet in the Solar System (after Eris) and the tenth-most-massive body observed directly orbiting the Sun.

Pluto n 1: a cartoon character created by Walt Disney 2: (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythology; brother of Zeus and husband of Persephone [syn: {Hades}, {Aides}, {Aidoneus}] 3: the second smallest planet and the farthest known from the sun; has the most elliptical orbit of all the planets

95 Moby Thesaurus words for "Pluto": Agdistis, Aides, Aidoneus, Amor, Aphrodite, Apollo, Apollon, Ares, Artemis, Ate, Athena, Bacchus, Cerberus, Ceres, Charon, Cora, Cronus, Cupid, Cybele, Demeter, Despoina, Diana, Dionysus, Dis, Dis pater, Earth, Erebus, Eros, Gaea, Gaia, Ge, Great Mother, Hades, Hel, Helios, Hephaestus, Hera, Here, Hermes, Hestia, Hymen, Hyperion, Jove, Juno, Jupiter, Jupiter Fidius, Jupiter Fulgur, Jupiter Optimus Maximus, Jupiter Pluvius, Jupiter Tonans, Kore, Kronos, Loki, Magna Mater, Mars, Mercury, Minerva, Minos, Mithras, Momus, Neptune, Nike, Olympians, Olympic gods, Ops, Orcus, Osiris, Persephassa, Persephone, Phoebus, Phoebus Apollo, Poseidon, Proserpina, Proserpine, Rhadamanthus, Rhea, Satan, Saturn, Tellus, Uranus, Venus, Vesta, Vulcan, Zeus, asteroid, inferior planet, major planet, minor planet, planet, planetoid, secondary planet, solar system, superior planet, terrestrial planet, wanderer

Pluto \Plu"to\, [Also spelled {rop. .]n. [L., fr. Gr. ?.] 1. (Class. Myth.) The son of Saturn and Rhea, brother of Jupiter and Neptune; the dark and gloomy god of the Lower World. [1913 Webster] 2. The ninth planet of the Solar System, the smallest (5700 km radius) and most distant from the sun. The suggestion has been made that it more closely resembles a large close comet than a planet. Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.248, larger than that of any other planet; it varies from 4.44 to 7.37 billion km distance from the sun. [PJC] Pluto is an oddball among its eight sister planets. It's the smallest in both size and mass, and has the most elliptical orbit. It moves in a plane tilted markedly away from the other planets' orbits. Moreover, Pluto is the only planet made almost entirely of ice. --Ron Cohen (Science News, Feb. 27, 1999, p. 139) {Pluto monkey} (Zo["o]l.), a long-tailed African monkey ({Cercopithecus pluto}), having side whiskers. The general color is black, more or less grizzled; the frontal band is white. [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • hades: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • hades: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • hades: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • hades: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • hades: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
  • hades: THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY ((C)1911 Released April 15 1993)
  • pluto: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • pluto: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • pluto: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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