Fiction and Literature

Fiction

Fiction is the form of any narrative or informative work that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not factual, but rather, imaginary and theoretical—that is, invented by the author.

fiction n 1: a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact 2: a deliberately false or improbable account [syn: {fabrication}, {fable}]

153 Moby Thesaurus words for "fiction": Marchen, Western, Western story, Westerner, adventure story, allegory, anecdote, apologue, apparition, article, autograph, bedtime story, blague, brainchild, bubble, canard, chimera, cock-and-bull story, composition, computer printout, concoction, copy, delirium, detective story, document, draft, edited version, eidolon, engrossment, essay, exaggeration, extravaganza, fable, fabliau, fabrication, fair copy, fairy tale, falsehood, falsity, fancy, fantasque, fantasy, farfetched story, farrago, fib, figment, final draft, finished version, first draft, fish story, flam, flimflam, flimsy, folk story, folktale, forgery, gest, ghost story, half-truth, hallucination, holograph, horse opera, idle fancy, illusion, imagery, imagination, imagining, insubstantial image, invention, legal fiction, legend, letter, lie, literae scriptae, literary artefact, literary production, literature, little white lie, love story, lucubration, maggot, make-believe, manuscript, matter, mendacity, misrepresentation, mystery, mystery story, myth, mythology, mythos, narrative, nonfiction, nursery tale, opus, original, paper, parable, parchment, penscript, phantasm, phantom, piece, piece of writing, pious fiction, play, poem, prevarication, printed matter, printout, production, reading matter, recension, romance, science fiction, screed, scrip, script, scrive, scroll, second draft, shocker, sick fancy, slight stretching, space fiction, space opera, story, suspense story, tale, tall story, tall tale, taradiddle, the written word, thick-coming fancies, thriller, transcript, transcription, trip, trumped-up story, typescript, untruth, vapor, version, vision, whim, whimsy, white lie, whodunit, wildest dreams, work, work of fiction, writing, yarn

Fiction \Fic"tion\, n. [F. fiction, L. fictio, fr. fingere, fictum to form, shape, invent, feign. See {Feign}.] 1. The act of feigning, inventing, or imagining; as, by a mere fiction of the mind. --Bp. Stillingfleet. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is feigned, invented, or imagined; especially, a feigned or invented story, whether oral or written. Hence: A story told in order to deceive; a fabrication; -- opposed to fact, or reality. [1913 Webster] The fiction of those golden apples kept by a dragon. --Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster] When it could no longer be denied that her flight had been voluntary, numerous fictions were invented to account for it. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 3. Fictitious literature; comprehensively, all works of imagination; specifically, novels and romances. [1913 Webster] The office of fiction as a vehicle of instruction and moral elevation has been recognized by most if not all great educators. --Dict. of Education. [1913 Webster] 4. (Law) An assumption of a possible thing as a fact, irrespective of the question of its truth. --Wharton. [1913 Webster] 5. Any like assumption made for convenience, as for passing more rapidly over what is not disputed, and arriving at points really at issue. Syn: Fabrication; invention; fable; falsehood. Usage: {Fiction}, {Fabrication}. Fiction is opposed to what is real; fabrication to what is true. Fiction is designed commonly to amuse, and sometimes to instruct; a fabrication is always intended to mislead and deceive. In the novels of Sir Walter Scott we have fiction of the highest order. The poems of Ossian, so called, were chiefly fabrications by Macpherson. [1913 Webster]

Literature

Literature (from Latin litterae (plural); letter) is the art of written work and can, in some circumstances, refer exclusively to published sources.

literature n 1: creative writing of recognized artistic value 2: the humanistic study of a body of literature; "he took a course in Russian lit" [syn: {lit}] 3: published writings in a particular style on a particular subject; "the technical literature"; "one aspect of Waterloo has not yet been treated in the literature" 4: the profession or art of a writer; "her place in literature is secure"

102 Moby Thesaurus words for "literature": French literature, Renaissance literature, ancient literature, article, autograph, belles lettres, belles-lettres, bibliography, body of knowledge, body of learning, brainchild, brochures, circulars, classics, composition, computer printout, contemporary literature, copy, cyclopedia, data, document, draft, edited version, encyclopedia, engrossment, erotic literature, erotica, essay, facts, fair copy, fiction, final draft, finished version, first draft, flimsy, folk literature, holograph, humane letters, information, kitsch, leaflets, letter, letters, literae scriptae, literary artefact, literary production, lore, lucubration, manuscript, materials, matter, medieval literature, national literature, nonfiction, obscene literature, opus, original, pamphlets, paper, parchment, penscript, piece, piece of writing, play, poem, polite literature, pop literature, popular literature, pornographic literature, pornography, printed matter, printout, production, propaganda, pseudonymous literature, publications, publicity, reading matter, recension, republic of letters, scatological literature, screed, scrip, script, scrive, scroll, second draft, serious literature, store of knowledge, system of knowledge, the written word, transcript, transcription, travel literature, treasury of information, typescript, underground literature, version, wisdom literature, work, writing, writings

Literature \Lit"er*a*ture\ (l[i^]t"[~e]r*[.a]*t[-u]r; 135), n. [F. litt['e]rature, L. litteratura, literatura, learning, grammar, writing, fr. littera, litera, letter. See {Letter}.] 1. Learning; acquaintance with letters or books. [1913 Webster] 2. The collective body of literary productions, embracing the entire results of knowledge and fancy preserved in writing; also, the whole body of literary productions or writings upon a given subject, or in reference to a particular science or branch of knowledge, or of a given country or period; as, the literature of Biblical criticism; the literature of chemistry. [1913 Webster] 3. The class of writings distinguished for beauty of style or expression, as poetry, essays, or history, in distinction from scientific treatises and works which contain positive knowledge; belles-lettres. [1913 Webster] 4. The occupation, profession, or business of doing literary work. --Lamb. Syn: Science; learning; erudition; belles-lettres. Usage: See {Science}. -- {Literature}, {Learning}, {Erudition}. Literature, in its widest sense, embraces all compositions in writing or print which preserve the results of observation, thought, or fancy; but those upon the positive sciences (mathematics, etc.) are usually excluded. It is often confined, however, to belles-lettres, or works of taste and sentiment, as poetry, eloquence, history, etc., excluding abstract discussions and mere erudition. A man of literature (in this narrowest sense) is one who is versed in belles-lettres; a man of learning excels in what is taught in the schools, and has a wide extent of knowledge, especially, in respect to the past; a man of erudition is one who is skilled in the more recondite branches of learned inquiry. [1913 Webster] The origin of all positive science and philosophy, as well as of all literature and art, in the forms in which they exist in civilized Europe, must be traced to the Greeks. --Sir G. C. Lewis. [1913 Webster] Learning thy talent is, but mine is sense. --Prior. [1913 Webster] Some gentlemen, abounding in their university erudition, fill their sermons with philosophical terms. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

literature The literature. Computer-science journals and other publications, vaguely gestured at to answer a question that the speaker believes is trivial. Thus, one might answer an annoying question by saying "It's in the literature." Oppose {Knuth}, which has no connotation of triviality. (1994-11-04)

Data Sources:

  • fiction: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • fiction: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • fiction: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • literature: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • literature: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • literature: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • literature: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03)

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