Fact and Truth

Fact

A fact (derived from the Latin factum, see below) is something that has really occurred or is actually the case.

fact n 1: a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred; "first you must collect all the facts of the case" 2: a statement or assertion of verified information about something that is the case or has happened; "he supported his argument with an impressive array of facts" 3: an event known to have happened or something known to have existed; "your fears have no basis in fact"; "how much of the story is fact and how much fiction is hard to tell" 4: a concept whose truth can be proved; "scientific hypotheses are not facts"

140 Moby Thesaurus words for "fact": absolute fact, accepted fact, accomplishment, act, actual fact, actuality, actually, admitted fact, adventure, article, aspect, authenticity, axiom, bald fact, bare fact, basis for belief, body of evidence, brutal fact, case, certainty, chain of evidence, circumstance, clue, cold fact, conceded fact, count, data, datum, deed, demonstrable fact, detail, details, documentation, element, empirical fact, episode, established fact, eternal verities, event, evidence, exhibit, experience, facet, fact of experience, factor, factors, facts, factually, fait accompli, genuineness, given fact, good sooth, grounds, grounds for belief, hap, happening, happenstance, hard fact, historical truth, historicity, in fact, in reality, in truth, incident, incidental, indeed, indication, indisputable fact, inescapable fact, information, instance, item, item of evidence, items, low-down, manifestation, mark, material grounds, matter, matter of fact, minor detail, minutia, minutiae, muniments, mute witness, naked fact, not guesswork, not opinion, observable, occasion, occurrence, particular, particulars, phenomenon, piece of evidence, plain, point, points, positive fact, postulate, premises, proof, provable fact, reality, really, reason to believe, regard, relevant fact, respect, salient fact, self-evident fact, sign, significant fact, simple fact, sober fact, sooth, stubborn fact, symptom, the case, the nitty-gritty, the score, the true, thing, to be sure, token, trueness, truly, truth, truthfully, truthfulness, turn of events, ultimate truth, undeniable fact, unerroneousness, unfallaciousness, unfalseness, veracity, verity, very truth, well-known fact

Fact \Fact\ (f[a^]kt), n. [L. factum, fr. facere to make or do. Cf. {Feat}, {Affair}, {Benefit}, {Defect}, {Fashion}, and {-fy}.] 1. A doing, making, or preparing. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A project for the fact and vending Of a new kind of fucus, paint for ladies. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] 2. An effect produced or achieved; anything done or that comes to pass; an act; an event; a circumstance. [1913 Webster] What might instigate him to this devilish fact, I am not able to conjecture. --Evelyn. [1913 Webster] He who most excels in fact of arms. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. Reality; actuality; truth; as, he, in fact, excelled all the rest; the fact is, he was beaten. [1913 Webster] 4. The assertion or statement of a thing done or existing; sometimes, even when false, improperly put, by a transfer of meaning, for the thing done, or supposed to be done; a thing supposed or asserted to be done; as, history abounds with false facts. [1913 Webster] I do not grant the fact. --De Foe. [1913 Webster] This reasoning is founded upon a fact which is not true. --Roger Long. [1913 Webster] Note: The term fact has in jurisprudence peculiar uses in contrast with law; as, attorney at law, and attorney in fact; issue in law, and issue in fact. There is also a grand distinction between law and fact with reference to the province of the judge and that of the jury, the latter generally determining the fact, the former the law. --Burrill --Bouvier. [1913 Webster] {Accessary before the fact}, or {Accessary after the fact}. See under {Accessary}. {Matter of fact}, an actual occurrence; a verity; used adjectively: of or pertaining to facts; prosaic; unimaginative; as, a matter-of-fact narration. Syn: Act; deed; performance; event; incident; occurrence; circumstance. [1913 Webster]

fact The kind of {clause} used in {logic programming} which has no {subgoals} and so is always true (always succeeds). E.g. wet(water). male(denis). This is in contrast to a {rule} which only succeeds if all its subgoals do. Rules usually contain {logic variables}, facts rarely do, except for oddities like "equal(X,X).". (1996-10-20)

FACT {Fully Automated Compiling Technique}

Truth

Truth is most often used to mean in accord with fact or reality, or fidelity to an original or to a standard or ideal.

truth n 1: a fact that has been verified; "at last he knew the truth"; "the truth is the he didn't want to do it" 2: conformity to reality or actuality; "they debated the truth of the proposition"; "the situation brought home to us the blunt truth of the military threat"; "he was famous for the truth of his portraits"; "he turned to religion in his search for eternal verities" [syn: {the true}, {verity}] [ant: {falsity}] 3: a true statement; "he told the truth"; "he thought of answering with the truth but he knew they wouldn't believe it" [syn: {true statement}] [ant: {falsehood}] 4: the quality of nearness to the truth or the true value; "he was beginning to doubt the accuracy of his compass"; "the lawyer questioned the truth of my account" [syn: {accuracy}] [ant: {inaccuracy}] 5: United States abolitionist and feminist who was freed from slavery and became a leading advocate of the abolition of slavery and for the rights of women (1797-1883) [syn: {Sojourner Truth}]

85 Moby Thesaurus words for "truth": a priori truth, absolute certainty, absolute credibility, absoluteness, accomplished fact, accuracy, actuality, actually, assurance, assuredness, authenticity, axiom, brocard, candor, certain knowledge, certainness, certainty, certitude, correctness, credibility, dead certainty, definiteness, determinacy, determinateness, dictate, dictum, fact, facts, factuality, fait accompli, formula, genuineness, golden rule, gospel, grim reality, historicity, in fact, in truth, ineluctability, inerrability, inerrancy, inevitability, infallibilism, infallibility, law, necessity, nonambiguity, noncontingency, not a dream, objective existence, positiveness, postulate, precision, predestination, predetermination, principium, principle, probatum, proposition, proved fact, reality, really, rightness, rule, self-evident truth, settled principle, sureness, surety, theorem, trueness, truism, truly, truth-loving, truth-speaking, truth-telling, truthfulness, unambiguity, unequivocalness, universal truth, univocity, unmistakableness, veraciousness, veracity, veridicality, verity

Truth \Truth\, v. t. To assert as true; to declare. [R.] [1913 Webster] Had they [the ancients] dreamt this, they would have truthed it heaven. --Ford. [1913 Webster]

Truth \Truth\, n.; pl. {Truths}. [OE. treuthe, trouthe, treowpe, AS. tre['o]w?. See {True}; cf. {Troth}, {Betroth}.] 1. The quality or being true; as: (a) Conformity to fact or reality; exact accordance with that which is, or has been; or shall be. [1913 Webster] (b) Conformity to rule; exactness; close correspondence with an example, mood, object of imitation, or the like. [1913 Webster] Plows, to go true, depend much on the truth of the ironwork. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster] (c) Fidelity; constancy; steadfastness; faithfulness. [1913 Webster] Alas! they had been friends in youth, But whispering tongues can poison truth. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] (d) The practice of speaking what is true; freedom from falsehood; veracity. [1913 Webster] If this will not suffice, it must appear That malice bears down truth. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is true or certain concerning any matter or subject, or generally on all subjects; real state of things; fact; verity; reality. [1913 Webster] Speak ye every man the truth to his neighbor. --Zech. viii. 16. [1913 Webster] I long to know the truth here of at large. --Shak. [1913 Webster] The truth depends on, or is only arrived at by, a legitimate deduction from all the facts which are truly material. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 3. A true thing; a verified fact; a true statement or proposition; an established principle, fixed law, or the like; as, the great truths of morals. [1913 Webster] Even so our boasting . . . is found a truth. --2 Cor. vii. 14. [1913 Webster] 4. Righteousness; true religion. [1913 Webster] Grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. --John i. 17. [1913 Webster] Sanctify them through thy truth; thy word is truth. --John xvii. 17. [1913 Webster] {In truth}, in reality; in fact. {Of a truth}, in reality; certainly. {To do truth}, to practice what God commands. [1913 Webster] He that doeth truth cometh to the light. --John iii. 21. [1913 Webster]

Truth Used in various senses in Scripture. In Prov. 12:17, 19, it denotes that which is opposed to falsehood. In Isa. 59:14, 15, Jer. 7:28, it means fidelity or truthfulness. The doctrine of Christ is called "the truth of the gospel" (Gal. 2:5), "the truth" (2 Tim. 3:7; 4:4). Our Lord says of himself, "I am the way, and the truth" (John 14:6).

TRUTH, n. An ingenious compound of desirability and appearance. Discovery of truth is the sole purpose of philosophy, which is the most ancient occupation of the human mind and has a fair prospect of existing with increasing activity to the end of time.

Data Sources:

  • fact: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • fact: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • fact: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • fact: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03)
  • fact: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03)
  • truth: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • truth: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • truth: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • truth: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • truth: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
  • truth: THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY ((C)1911 Released April 15 1993)

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