Dove and Pigeon

Dove

Pigeons and doves constitute the bird family, Columbidae, that includes some 310 species of near passerines.

dove See {dive}

dove n 1: any of numerous small pigeons 2: someone who prefers negotiations to armed conflict in the conduct of foreign relations [syn: {peacenik}] [ant: {hawk}] 3: a constellation in the southern hemisphere near Puppis and Caelum [syn: {Columba}] 4: flesh of a pigeon suitable for roasting or braising; flesh of a dove (young squab) may be broiled [syn: {squab}] 5: an emblem of peace

dive n 1: a cheap disreputable nightclub or dance hall [syn: {honkytonk}] 2: a headlong plunge into water [syn: {diving}] 3: a steep nose-down descent by an aircraft [syn: {nose dive}] v 1: drop steeply; "the stock market plunged" [syn: {plunge}, {plunk}] 2: plunge into water; "I was afraid to dive from the board into the pool" 3: swim under water; "the children enjoyed diving and looking for shells" [also: {dove}]

dive See {diva} [also: {dove}]

79 Moby Thesaurus words for "dove": angel, avifauna, babe, baby bird, bird, bird of Jove, bird of Juno, bird of Minerva, bird of night, bird of passage, bird of prey, birdie, birdlife, birdy, cage bird, chick, child, child of nature, conchie, conscientious objector, cygnet, diving bird, dupe, eagle, eaglet, fish-eating bird, fledgling, flightless bird, fowl, fruit-eating bird, fulmar, game bird, hick, infant, ingenue, innocent, insect-eating bird, lamb, lout, mere child, migrant, migratory bird, nestling, newborn babe, noble savage, oaf, oscine bird, owl, pacificator, pacificist, pacifist, passerine bird, peace lover, peacemaker, peacemonger, peacenik, peacock, peafowl, peahen, perching bird, pigeon, ratite, rube, sea bird, seed-eating bird, shore bird, simple soul, songbird, squab, storm petrel, stormy petrel, swan, unsophisticate, wading bird, warbler, water bird, waterfowl, wildfowl, yokel

Dove \Dove\ (d[u^]v), n. [OE. dove, duve, douve, AS. d[=u]fe; akin to OS. d[=u]ba, D. duif, OHG. t[=u]ba, G. taube, Icel. d[=u]fa, Sw. dufva, Dan. due, Goth. d[=u]b[=o]; perh. from the root of E. dive.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A pigeon of the genus {Columba} and various related genera. The species are numerous. [1913 Webster] Note: The domestic dove, including the varieties called {fantails}, {tumblers}, {carrier pigeons}, etc., was derived from the {rock pigeon} ({Columba livia}) of Europe and Asia; the {turtledove} of Europe, celebrated for its sweet, plaintive note, is {Columba turtur} or {Turtur vulgaris}; the {ringdove}, the largest of European species, is {Columba palumbus}; the {Carolina dove}, or {Mourning dove}, is {Zenaidura macroura}; the {sea dove} is the little auk ({Mergulus alle} or {Alle alle}). See {Turtledove}, {Ground dove}, and {Rock pigeon}. The dove is a symbol of peace, innocence, gentleness, and affection; also, in art and in the Scriptures, the typical symbol of the Holy Ghost. [1913 Webster] 2. A word of endearment for one regarded as pure and gentle. [1913 Webster] O my dove, . . . let me hear thy voice. --Cant. ii. 14. [1913 Webster] 3. a person advocating peace, compromise or conciliation rather than war or conflict. Opposite of {hawk}. [PJC] {Dove tick} (Zo["o]l.), a mite ({Argas reflexus}) which infests doves and other birds. {Soiled dove}, a prostitute. [Slang]

Dive \Dive\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Dived}, colloq. {Dove}, a relic of the AS. strong forms de['a]f, dofen; p. pr. & vb. n. {Diving}.] [OE. diven, duven, AS. d?fan to sink, v. t., fr. d?fan, v. i.; akin to Icel. d?fa, G. taufen, E. dip, deep, and perh. to dove, n. Cf. {Dip}.] 1. To plunge into water head foremost; to thrust the body under, or deeply into, water or other fluid. [1913 Webster] It is not that pearls fetch a high price because men have dived for them. --Whately. [1913 Webster] Note: The colloquial form dove is common in the United States as an imperfect tense form. [1913 Webster] All [the walruses] dove down with a tremendous splash. --Dr. Hayes. [1913 Webster] When closely pressed it [the loon] dove . . . and left the young bird sitting in the water. --J. Burroughs. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: To plunge or to go deeply into any subject, question, business, etc.; to penetrate; to explore. --South. [1913 Webster]

Dove In their wild state doves generally build their nests in the clefts of rocks, but when domesticated "dove-cots" are prepared for them (Cant. 2:14; Jer. 48:28; Isa. 60:8). The dove was placed on the standards of the Assyrians and Babylonians in honour, it is supposed, of Semiramis (Jer. 25:38; Vulg., "fierceness of the dove;" comp. Jer. 46:16; 50:16). Doves and turtle-doves were the only birds that could be offered in sacrifice, as they were clean according to the Mosaic law (Ge. 15:9; Lev. 5:7; 12:6; Luke 2:24). The dove was the harbinger of peace to Noah (Gen. 8:8, 10). It is often mentioned as the emblem of purity (Ps. 68:13). It is a symbol of the Holy Spirit (Gen. 1:2; Matt. 3:16; Mark 1:10; Luke 3:22; John 1:32); also of tender and devoted affection (Cant. 1:15; 2:14). David in his distress wished that he had the wings of a dove, that he might fly away and be at rest (Ps. 55:6-8). There is a species of dove found at Damascus "whose feathers, all except the wings, are literally as yellow as gold" (68:13).

Pigeon

Pigeons and doves constitute the bird family, Columbidae, that includes some 310 species of near passerines.

pigeon n : wild and domesticated birds having a heavy body and short legs

193 Moby Thesaurus words for "pigeon": Cornish hen, avifauna, babe, baby bird, bamboozle, beat, beguile, beguile of, betray, bilk, bird, bird of Jove, bird of Juno, bird of Minerva, bird of night, bird of passage, bird of prey, birdie, birdlife, birdy, bluff, boob, broiler, bunco, burn, cage bird, caille, cajole, canard, caneton, capon, chapon, cheat, cheat on, chick, chicken, chisel, chouse, chouse out of, chump, cinch, circumvent, cog, cog the dice, con, conjure, cozen, credulous person, crib, cull, cygnet, deceive, defraud, delude, diddle, dindon, diving bird, do in, do out of, double-cross, dove, duck, duckling, dupe, eagle, eaglet, easy mark, easy pickings, euchre, faisan, fall guy, finagle, fish, fish-eating bird, flam, fledgling, fleece, flightless bird, flimflam, fob, fool, forestall, fowl, fruit-eating bird, fryer, fudge, fulmar, game bird, gammon, get around, gobe-mouches, goose, gouge, greener, greenhorn, greeny, grouse, gudgeon, guff, guinea hen, gull, gyp, have, hoax, hocus, hocus-pocus, hornswaggle, humbug, innocent, insect-eating bird, juggle, leadpipe cinch, let down, mark, migrant, migratory bird, mock, monkey, mulct, nestling, oie, oscine bird, outmaneuver, outreach, outsmart, outwit, overreach, owl, pack the deal, partridge, passerine bird, patsy, peacock, peafowl, peahen, perching bird, pheasant, pigeonneau, play one false, plaything, poulet, practice fraud upon, prize sap, pushover, put something over, quail, ratite, roaster, rook, sap, saphead, scam, schlemiel, screw, sea bird, seed-eating bird, sell gold bricks, shave, shore bird, shortchange, sitting duck, snow, songbird, squab, stack the cards, stewing chicken, stick, sting, stooge, storm petrel, stormy petrel, string along, sucker, swan, swindle, take a dive, take in, thimblerig, throw a fight, toy, trick, trusting soul, turkey, two-time, victim, victimize, volaille, wading bird, warbler, water bird, waterfowl, wild duck, wildfowl

Pigeon \Pi"geon\, v. t. To pluck; to fleece; to swindle by tricks in gambling. [Slang] --Smart. [1913 Webster] He's pigeoned and undone. --Observer. [1913 Webster]

Pigeon \Pi"geon\, n. [F., fr. L. pipio a young pipping or chirping bird, fr. pipire to peep, chirp. Cf. {Peep} to chirp.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any bird of the order Columb[ae], of which numerous species occur in nearly all parts of the world. [1913 Webster] Note: The common domestic pigeon, or dove, was derived from the Old World rock pigeon or rock dove ({Columba livia}), common in cities. It has given rise to numerous very remarkable varieties, such as the carrier, fantail, nun, pouter, tumbler, etc. The common wild pigeon of the Eastern United States is the {Mourning dove} ({Zenaida macroura}, called also {Carolina dove}). Before the 19th century, the most common pigeon was the passenger pigeon, but that species is now extinct. See {Passenger pigeon}, and {Carolina dove} under {Dove}. See, also, {Fruit pigeon}, {Ground pigeon}, {Queen pigeon}, {Stock pigeon}, under {Fruit}, {Ground}, etc. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. An unsuspected victim of sharpers; a gull. [Slang] [1913 Webster] {Blue pigeon} (Zo["o]l.), an Australian passerine bird ({Graucalus melanops}); -- called also {black-faced crow}. {Green pigeon} (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to the family {Treronid[ae]}. {Imperial pigeon} (Zo["o]l.), any one of the large Asiatic fruit pigeons of the genus {Carpophada}. {Pigeon berry} (Bot.), the purplish black fruit of the pokeweed; also, the plant itself. See {Pokeweed}. {Pigeon English} [perhaps a corruption of business English], an extraordinary and grotesque dialect, employed in the commercial cities of China, as the medium of communication between foreign merchants and the Chinese. Its base is English, with a mixture of Portuguese and Hindustani. --Johnson's Cyc. {Pigeon grass} (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass ({Setaria glauca}), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. {Pigeon hawk}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon ({Falco columbarius}). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk ({Accipiter velox} or {Accipiter fuscus}). {Pigeon hole}. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See {Pigeonhole}. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. {Pigeon house}, a dovecote. {Pigeon pea} (Bot.), the seed of {Cajanus Indicus}; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. {Pigeon plum} (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of {Chrysobalanus} ({Chrysobalanus ellipticus} and {Chrysobalanus luteus}). {Pigeon tremex}. (Zo["o]l.) See under {Tremex}. {Pigeon wood} (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of {Dipholis}, {Diospyros}, and {Coccoloba}. {Pigeon woodpecker} (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. {Prairie pigeon}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.] [1913 Webster]

Pigeon, MI (village, FIPS 64060) Location: 43.82950 N, 83.26999 W Population (1990): 1207 (533 housing units) Area: 2.1 sq km (land), 0.0 sq km (water) Zip code(s): 48755 Pigeon, WV Zip code(s): 25164

Pigeon Pigeons are mentioned as among the offerings which, by divine appointment, Abram presented unto the Lord (Gen. 15:9). They were afterwards enumerated among the sin-offerings (Lev. 1:14; 12:6), and the law provided that those who could not offer a lamb might offer two young pigeons (5:7; comp. Luke 2:24). (See {DOVE}.)

Data Sources:

  • dove: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • dove: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • dove: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • dove: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • dove: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • dove: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • dove: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • dove: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
  • pigeon: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • pigeon: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • pigeon: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • pigeon: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • pigeon: U.S. Gazetteer (1990)
  • pigeon: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary

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