Buddha and Jesus

Buddha

Gautama Buddha or Siddhārtha Gautama Buddha (Sanskrit: ; Pali: Siddhattha Gotama) was a spiritual teacher from the Indian subcontinent

Buddha n 1: founder of Buddhism; worshipped as a god (c 563-483 BC) [syn: {the Buddha}, {Siddhartha}, {Gautama}, {Gautama Siddhartha}, {Gautama Buddha}] 2: one who has achieved a state of perfect enlightenment

24 Moby Thesaurus words for "Buddha": Confucius, Gandhi, Jagannath, Juggernaut, Kurma, Mahavira, Matsya, Mentor, Muhammad, Narsinh, Nestor, Parshuram, Plato, Rama, Socrates, Solomon, Vaman, Varah, Vardhamana, Zoroaster, bodhisattva, the Blessed One, the Lord Buddha, the Teacher

Buddha \Bud"dha\, n. [Skr. buddha wise, sage, 'the enlightened' fr. budh to know.] 1. The title of an incarnation of self-abnegation, virtue, and wisdom. [1913 Webster] 2. The title of Siddhartha or Gautama, a deified religious teacher of the Buddhists and the founder of Buddhism; called also {Gautama Siddartha} or {Sakya Sinha} (or Muni). From three newly discovered inscriptions of the emperor Asoka it follows that the 37th year of his reign was reckoned as the 257th from the death of Buddha. Hence it is inferred that Buddha died between 482 and 472 B. C. It being agreed that he lived to be eighty, he was born between 562 and 552 B. C. The Buddhist narratives of his life are overgrown with legend and myth. Senart seeks to trace in them the history of the sun-hero. Oldenberg finds in the most ancient traditions -- those of Ceylon -- at least definite historical outlines. Siddhartha, as Buddha was called before entering upon his great mission, was born in the country and tribe of the Sakhyas, at the foot of the Nepalese Himalayas. His father, Suddhodana, was rather a great and wealthy landowner than a king. He passed his youth in opulence at Kapila-vastu, the Sakhya capital. He was married and had a son Rahula, who became a member of his order. At the age of twenty-nine he left parents, wife, and only son for the spiritual struggle of a recluse. After seven years he believed himself possessed of perfect truth, and assumed the title of Buddha, 'the enlightened.' He is represented as having received a sudden illumination as he sat under the Bo-tree, or ' tree of knowledge,' at Bodhgaya or Buddha-Gaya. For twenty-eight or, as later narratives give it, forty-nine days he was variously tempted by Mara. One of his doubts was whether to keep for himself the knowledge won, or to share it. Love triumphed, and he began to preach, at first at Benares. For forty-four years he preached in the region of Benares and Behar. Primitive Buddhism is only to be gathered by inference from the literature of a later time. Buddha did not array himself against the old religion. The doctrines were rather the outgrowth of those of certain Brahmanical schools. His especial concern was salvation from sorrow, and so from existence. There are "four noble truths": (1) existence is suffering; (2) the cause of pain is desire, (3) cessation of pain is possible through the suppression of desire; (4) the way to this is the knowledge and observance of the "good law " of Buddha. The end is Nirvana, the cessation of existence. Buddhism was preached in the vulgar tongue, and had a popular literature and an elaborately organized monastic and missionary system. It made its way into Afghanistan, Bactriana., Tibet, and China. It passed away in India not from Brahman persecution, but rather from internal causes, such as its too abstract nature, too morbid view of life, relaxed discipline, and overgrowth of monasticism, and also because Shivaism and Vishnuism employed many of its own weapons more effectively. The system has been variously modified in dogma and rites in the many countries to which it has spread. It is supposed to number about 850,000,000 of adherents, who are principally in Ceylon, Tibet, China, and Japan. [Century Dict. 1906.]

Jesus

Jesus (; ; 7–2 BC/BCE to 30–36 AD/CE), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity, whom a majority of Christian denominations believe to be the Son of God.

Jesus n : a teacher and prophet born in Bethlehem and active in Nazareth; his life and sermons form the basis for Christianity (circa 4 BC - AD 29) [syn: {Jesus of Nazareth}, {the Nazarene}, {Jesus Christ}, {Christ}, {Savior}, {Saviour}, {Good Shepherd}, {Redeemer}, {Deliverer}]

Jesus, savior; deliverer

Jesus \Je"sus\ (j[=e]"z[u^]s), prop. n. [L. Jesus, Gr. ?, from Heb. Y[=e]sh[=u]a'; Y[=a]h Jehovah + h[=o]sh[imac]a' to help.] The {Savior}; the name of the Son of God as announced by the angel to his parents; the personal name of Our Lord, in distinction from Christ, his official appellation. --Luke i. 31. [1913 Webster] Thou shalt call his name Jesus; for he shall save his people from their sins. --Matt. i. 21. [1913 Webster] Note: The form Jesu is often used, esp. in the vocative. [1913 Webster] Jesu, do thou my soul receive. --Keble. [1913 Webster] {The Society of Jesus}. The Roman Catholic order whose members are called Jesuits. See {Jesuit}. [1913 Webster]

Jesus (1.) Joshua, the son of Nun (Acts 7:45; Heb. 4:8; R.V., "Joshua"). (2.) A Jewish Christian surnamed Justus (Col. 4:11). Je'sus, the proper, as Christ is the official, name of our Lord. To distinguish him from others so called, he is spoken of as "Jesus of Nazareth" (John 18:7), and "Jesus the son of Joseph" (John 6:42). This is the Greek form of the Hebrew name Joshua, which was originally Hoshea (Num. 13:8, 16), but changed by Moses into Jehoshua (Num. 13:16; 1 Chr. 7:27), or Joshua. After the Exile it assumed the form Jeshua, whence the Greek form Jesus. It was given to our Lord to denote the object of his mission, to save (Matt. 1:21). The life of Jesus on earth may be divided into two great periods, (1) that of his private life, till he was about thirty years of age; and (2) that of his public life, which lasted about three years. In the "fulness of time" he was born at Bethlehem, in the reign of the emperor Augustus, of Mary, who was betrothed to Joseph, a carpenter (Matt. 1:1; Luke 3:23; comp. John 7:42). His birth was announced to the shepherds (Luke 2:8-20). Wise men from the east came to Bethlehem to see him who was born "King of the Jews," bringing gifts with them (Matt. 2:1-12). Herod's cruel jealousy led to Joseph's flight into Egypt with Mary and the infant Jesus, where they tarried till the death of this king (Matt. 2:13-23), when they returned and settled in Nazareth, in Lower Galilee (2:23; comp. Luke 4:16; John 1:46, etc.). At the age of twelve years he went up to Jerusalem to the Passover with his parents. There, in the temple, "in the midst of the doctors," all that heard him were "astonished at his understanding and answers" (Luke 2:41, etc.). Eighteen years pass, of which we have no record beyond this, that he returned to Nazareth and "increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man" (Luke 2:52). He entered on his public ministry when he was about thirty years of age. It is generally reckoned to have extended to about three years. "Each of these years had peculiar features of its own. (1.) The first year may be called the year of obscurity, both because the records of it which we possess are very scanty, and because he seems during it to have been only slowly emerging into public notice. It was spent for the most part in Judea. (2.) The second year was the year of public favour, during which the country had become thoroughly aware of him; his activity was incessant, and his frame rang through the length and breadth of the land. It was almost wholly passed in Galilee. (3.) The third was the year of opposition, when the public favour ebbed away. His enemies multiplied and assailed him with more and more pertinacity, and at last he fell a victim to their hatred. The first six months of this final year were passed in Galilee, and the last six in other parts of the land.", Stalker's Life of Jesus Christ, p. 45. The only reliable sources of information regarding the life of Christ on earth are the Gospels, which present in historical detail the words and the work of Christ in so many different aspects. (See {CHIRST}.)

Data Sources:

  • buddha: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • buddha: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • buddha: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • jesus: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • jesus: Hitchcock's Bible Names Dictionary (late 1800's)
  • jesus: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • jesus: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary

Currently unrated



Your Comparisons - Buddha And Jesus