Let's Compare Bakers-Yeast and Saccharomyces-Cerevisiae

Bakers-Yeast

Baker's yeast is the common name for the strains of yeast commonly used as a leavening agent in baking bread and bakery products, where it converts the fermentable sugars present in the dough into carbon dioxide and ethanol.

baker's yeast n : used as a leaven in baking and brewing [syn: {brewer's yeast}, {Saccharomyces cerevisiae}]

Saccharomyces-Cerevisiae

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a species of yeast. It is perhaps the most useful yeast, having been instrumental to winemaking, baking and brewing since ancient times.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae n : used as a leaven in baking and brewing [syn: {baker's yeast}, {brewer's yeast}]

Alcohol \Al"co*hol\ ([a^]l"k[-o]*h[o^]l), n. [Cf. F. alcool, formerly written alcohol, Sp. alcohol alcohol, antimony, galena, OSp. alcofol; all fr. Ar. al-kohl a powder of antimony or galena, to paint the eyebrows with. The name was afterwards applied, on account of the fineness of this powder, to highly rectified spirits, a signification unknown in Arabia. The Sp. word has both meanings. Cf. {Alquifou}.] 1. An impalpable powder. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. The fluid essence or pure spirit obtained by distillation. [Obs.] --Boyle. [1913 Webster] 3. Pure spirit of wine; pure or highly rectified spirit (called also {ethyl alcohol} or {ethanol}, {CH3.CH2.OH}); the spirituous or intoxicating element of fermented or distilled liquors, or more loosely a liquid containing it in considerable quantity. It is extracted by simple distillation from various vegetable juices and infusions of a saccharine nature, which have undergone vinous fermentation. Note: [The ferementation is usually carried out by addition of brewer's yeast, {Saccharomyces cerevisiae} to an aqueous solution containing carbohydrates.] [1913 Webster +PJC] Note: As used in the U. S. ``Pharmacop[oe]ia,'' alcohol contains 91 per cent by weight of ethyl alcohol and 9 per cent of water; and diluted alcohol (proof spirit) contains 45.5 per cent by weight of ethyl alcohol and 54.5 per cent of water. [1913 Webster] 4. (Organic Chem.) A class of compounds analogous to vinic alcohol in constitution. Chemically speaking, they are hydroxides of certain organic radicals; as, the radical ethyl forms common or {ethyl alcohol} ({C2H5.OH}); methyl forms {methyl alcohol} ({CH3.OH}) or {wood spirit}; amyl forms {amyl alcohol} ({C5H11.OH}) or {fusel oil}, etc. [1913 Webster]

Saccharomyces \Sac`cha*ro*my"ces\, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? sugar + ?, ?, a fungus.] (Biol.) A genus of budding fungi, the various species of which have the power, to a greater or less extent, or splitting up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid. They are the active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer, etc. {Saccharomyces cerevisi[ae]} is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also called {Torula}. [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • bakers-yeast: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • saccharomyces-cerevisiae: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • saccharomyces-cerevisiae: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • saccharomyces-cerevisiae: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

Currently unrated



Your Comparisons - Bakers-Yeast And Saccharomyces-Cerevisiae