Bacteria and Germ

Bacteria

Bacteria (; singular: bacterium) are a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a wide range of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals.

bacteria n : (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered plants [syn: {bacterium}]

56 Moby Thesaurus words for "bacteria": Euglena, adenovirus, aerobe, aerobic bacteria, amoeba, anaerobe, anaerobic bacteria, animalcule, bacillus, bacterium, bug, coccus, colon bacillus, diatom, disease-producing microorganism, dyad, echovirus, enterovirus, filterable virus, flagellate, fungus, germ, gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, microbe, microorganism, microspore, microzoa, mold, monad, nematode, nonfilterable virus, paramecium, pathogen, picornavirus, protozoa, protozoon, reovirus, rhinovirus, rickettsia, salmonella, saprophyte, spirillum, spirochete, spore, sporozoon, staphylococcus, streptococcus, tetrad, triad, trypanosome, vibrio, virus, volvox, vorticellum, zoospore

Bacterium \Bac*te"ri*um\ (b[a^]k*t[=e]"r[i^]*[u^]m), n.; pl. {Bacteria} (b[a^]k*t[=e]"r[i^]*[.a]). [NL., fr. Gr. bakth`rion, ba`ktron, a staff: cf. F. bact['e]rie.] (Biol.) A microscopic single-celled organism having no distinguishable nucleus, belonging to the kingdom Monera. Bacteria have varying shapes, usually taking the form of a jointed rodlike filament, or a small sphere, but also in certain cases having a branched form. Bacteria are destitute of chlorophyll, but in those members of the phylum Cyanophyta (the blue-green algae) other light-absorbing pigments are present. They are the smallest of microscopic organisms which have their own metabolic processes carried on within cell membranes, viruses being smaller but not capable of living freely. The bacteria are very widely diffused in nature, and multiply with marvelous rapidity, both by fission and by spores. Bacteria may require oxygen for their energy-producing metabolism, and these are called {aerobes}; or may multiply in the absence of oxygen, these forms being {anaerobes}. Certain species are active agents in fermentation, while others appear to be the cause of certain infectious diseases. The branch of science with studies bacteria is {bacteriology}, being a division of {microbiology}. See {Bacillus}. [1913 Webster +PJC]

Bacteria \Bac*te"ri*a\, n. pl. See {Bacterium}. [1913 Webster]

Germ

Germany (), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (, ), is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe.

germ n 1: anything that provides inspiration for later work [syn: {source}, {seed}] 2: a small simple structure (as a fertilized egg) from which new tissue can develop into a complete organism 3: a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use [syn: {microbe}, {bug}]

81 Moby Thesaurus words for "germ": Anlage, Euglena, adenovirus, aerobe, aerobic bacteria, amoeba, anaerobe, anaerobic bacteria, animalcule, bacillus, bacteria, bacterium, base, basis, beginning, blastula, bud, bug, coccus, colon bacillus, diatom, disease-producing microorganism, dyad, echovirus, egg, embryo, enterovirus, fetus, filterable virus, flagellate, fount, fungus, germen, gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, larva, loins, microbe, microorganism, microspore, microzoa, mold, monad, nematode, nonfilterable virus, nucleus, nymph, origin, ovum, paramecium, pathogen, picornavirus, protozoa, protozoon, reovirus, rhinovirus, rickettsia, root, rudiment, salmonella, saprophyte, seed, source, spark, spermatozoon, spirillum, spirochete, spore, sporozoon, staphylococcus, start, streptococcus, tetrad, triad, trypanosome, vibrio, virus, volvox, vorticellum, zoospore, zygote

Germ \Germ\ (j[~e]rm), n. [F. germe, fr. L. germen, germinis, sprout, but, germ. Cf. {Germen}, {Germane}.] 1. (Biol.) That which is to develop a new individual; as, the germ of a fetus, of a plant or flower, and the like; the earliest form under which an organism appears. [1913 Webster] In the entire process in which a new being originates . . . two distinct classes of action participate; namely, the act of generation by which the germ is produced; and the act of development, by which that germ is evolved into the complete organism. --Carpenter. [1913 Webster] 2. That from which anything springs; origin; first principle; as, the germ of civil liberty. [1913 Webster] 3. (Biol.) The germ cells, collectively, as distinguished from the somatic cells, or {soma}. Germ is often used in place of germinal to form phrases; as, germ area, germ disc, germ membrane, germ nucleus, germ sac, etc. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 4. A microorganism, especially a disease-causing bacterium or virus; -- used informally, as, the don't eat food that falls on the floor, it may have germs on it. [PJC] {Disease germ} (Biol.), a name applied to certain tiny bacterial organisms or their spores, such as {Anthrax bacillus} and the {Micrococcus} of fowl cholera, which have been demonstrated to be the cause of certain diseases; same as germ[4]. See {Germ theory} (below). {Germ cell} (Biol.), the germ, egg, spore, or cell from which the plant or animal arises. At one time a part of the body of the parent, it finally becomes detached, and by a process of multiplication and growth gives rise to a mass of cells, which ultimately form a new individual like the parent. See {Ovum}. {Germ gland}. (Anat.) See {Gonad}. {Germ stock} (Zo["o]l.), a special process on which buds are developed in certain animals. See {Doliolum}. {Germ theory} (Biol.), the theory that living organisms can be produced only by the evolution or development of living germs or seeds. See {Biogenesis}, and {Abiogenesis}. As applied to the origin of disease, the theory claims that the zymotic diseases are due to the rapid development and multiplication of various bacteria, the germs or spores of which are either contained in the organism itself, or transferred through the air or water. See {Fermentation theory}. [1913 Webster]

Germ \Germ\, v. i. To germinate. [R.] --J. Morley. [1913 Webster]

Data Sources:

  • bacteria: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • bacteria: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • bacteria: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • bacteria: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • germ: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • germ: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • germ: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • germ: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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