Assurance and Insurance

Assurance

Assurance may refer to:

assurance n 1: freedom from doubt; belief in yourself and your abilities; "his assurance in his superiority did not make him popular"; "after that failure he lost his confidence"; "she spoke with authority" [syn: {self-assurance}, {confidence}, {self-confidence}, {authority}, {sureness}] 2: a binding commitment to do or give or refrain from something; "an assurance of help when needed"; "signed a pledge never to reveal the secret" [syn: {pledge}] 3: a statement intended to inspire confidence; "the President's assurances were not respected" 4: a British term for some kinds of insurance

266 Moby Thesaurus words for "assurance": Bible oath, absolute certainty, absoluteness, acceptation, acception, accident insurance, acquiescence, actuary, agreement, aid and comfort, annuity, aplomb, arrogance, ascertainment, aspiration, assumption, assured faith, assuredness, audacity, aviation insurance, avouch, avouchment, avow, bail bond, balance, belief, boldness, bond, brashness, brass, brazenness, bumptiousness, business life insurance, casualty insurance, certain knowledge, certainness, certainty, certificate of insurance, certification, certitude, check, checking, cheek, cheerful expectation, chutzpah, clear sailing, cockiness, cocksureness, collation, comfort, commitment, compact, composure, conceit, condolence, confidence, confidentness, confirmation, consolation, control, contumely, conviction, coolness, courage, court bond, covenant, credence, credit, credit insurance, credit life insurance, credulity, dead certainty, deductible, definiteness, dependence, desire, determinacy, determinateness, determination, doomed hope, easement, effrontery, emboldening, encouragement, endowment insurance, ensuring, equability, equanimity, equilibrium, establishment, expectation, extrajudicial oath, fair prospect, faith, family maintenance policy, fervent hope, fidelity bond, fidelity insurance, flood insurance, fraternal insurance, gall, good cheer, good hope, government insurance, great expectations, guarantee, guaranty, gumption, guts, gutsiness, hardihood, hardiness, harmlessness, health insurance, heartening, high hopes, hope, hopeful prognosis, hopefulness, hopes, hoping, hoping against hope, hubris, immunity, impudence, indemnity, industrial life insurance, ineluctability, inerrability, inerrancy, inevitability, infallibilism, infallibility, insolence, inspiration, inspiriting, inspiritment, insurance, insurance agent, insurance broker, insurance company, insurance man, insurance policy, interinsurance, intrepidity, invulnerability, ironclad oath, judicial oath, level head, levelheadedness, liability insurance, license bond, limited payment insurance, loyalty oath, major medical insurance, malpractice insurance, marine insurance, mutual company, necessity, nerve, nonambiguity, noncontingency, oath, oath of allegiance, oath of office, obtrusiveness, ocean marine insurance, official oath, overconfidence, oversureness, overweening, overweeningness, pact, parole, permit bond, pledge, plight, poise, policy, pomposity, positiveness, possession, prayerful hope, predestination, predetermination, presence of mind, presumption, presumptuousness, pride, probatum, procacity, promise, prospect, prospects, protection, proved fact, pushiness, reassurance, reassurement, reception, reliance, reliance on, relief, resolve, restraint, risklessness, robbery insurance, safeguard, safeness, safety, sangfroid, sanguine expectation, security, self-assurance, self-command, self-conceit, self-confidence, self-control, self-importance, self-possession, self-reliance, self-restraint, settled belief, shred of comfort, social security, solace, solacement, solemn declaration, solemn oath, steadiness, stock, stock company, stocks and bonds, store, subjective certainty, substantiation, support, sureness, surety, suspension of disbelief, sympathy, term insurance, test oath, theft insurance, tie, troth, trust, truth, unambiguity, understanding, underwriter, unequivocalness, univocity, unmistakableness, uppishness, uppityness, validation, vanity, verification, vow, warrant, warranty, well-grounded hope, well-regulated mind, word, word of honor

Assurance \As*sur"ance\, n. [OE. assuraunce, F. assurance, fr. assurer. See {Assure}.] 1. The act of assuring; a declaration tending to inspire full confidence; that which is designed to give confidence. [1913 Webster] Whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead. --Acts xvii. 31. [1913 Webster] Assurances of support came pouring in daily. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. The state of being assured; firm persuasion; full confidence or trust; freedom from doubt; certainty. [1913 Webster] Let us draw with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience. --Heb. x. 22. [1913 Webster] 3. Firmness of mind; undoubting, steadiness; intrepidity; courage; confidence; self-reliance. [1913 Webster] Brave men meet danger with assurance. --Knolles. [1913 Webster] Conversation with the world will give them knowledge and assurance. --Locke. [1913 Webster] 4. Excess of boldness; impudence; audacity; as, his assurance is intolerable. [1913 Webster] 5. Betrothal; affiance. [Obs.] --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] 6. Insurance; a contract for the payment of a sum on occasion of a certain event, as loss or death. [1913 Webster] Note: Recently, assurance has been used, in England, in relation to life contingencies, and insurance in relation to other contingencies. It is called temporary assurance, in the time within which the contingent event must happen is limited. See {Insurance}. [1913 Webster] 7. (Law) Any written or other legal evidence of the conveyance of property; a conveyance; a deed. [1913 Webster] Note: In England, the legal evidences of the conveyance of property are called the common assurances of the kingdom. --Blackstone. [1913 Webster]

Assurance The resurrection of Jesus (Acts 17:31) is the "assurance" (Gr. pistis, generally rendered "faith") or pledge God has given that his revelation is true and worthy of acceptance. The "full assurance [Gr. plerophoria, 'full bearing'] of faith" (Heb. 10:22) is a fulness of faith in God which leaves no room for doubt. The "full assurance of understanding" (Col. 2:2) is an entire unwavering conviction of the truth of the declarations of Scripture, a joyful steadfastness on the part of any one of conviction that he has grasped the very truth. The "full assurance of hope" (Heb. 6:11) is a sure and well-grounded expectation of eternal glory (2 Tim. 4:7, 8). This assurance of hope is the assurance of a man's own particular salvation. This infallible assurance, which believers may attain unto as to their own personal salvation, is founded on the truth of the promises (Heb. 6:18), on the inward evidence of Christian graces, and on the testimony of the Spirit of adoption (Rom. 8:16). That such a certainty may be attained appears from the testimony of Scripture (Rom. 8:16; 1 John 2:3; 3:14), from the command to seek after it (Heb. 6:11; 2 Pet. 1:10), and from the fact that it has been attained (2 Tim. 1:12; 4:7, 8; 1 John 2:3; 4:16). This full assurance is not of the essence of saving faith. It is the result of faith, and posterior to it in the order of nature, and so frequently also in the order of time. True believers may be destitute of it. Trust itself is something different from the evidence that we do trust. Believers, moreover, are exhorted to go on to something beyond what they at present have when they are exhorted to seek the grace of full assurance (Heb. 10:22; 2 Pet. 1:5-10). The attainment of this grace is a duty, and is to be diligently sought. "Genuine assurance naturally leads to a legitimate and abiding peace and joy, and to love and thankfulness to God; and these from the very laws of our being to greater buoyancy, strength, and cheerfulness in the practice of obedience in every department of duty." This assurance may in various ways be shaken, diminished, and intermitted, but the principle out of which it springs can never be lost. (See {FAITH}.)

Insurance

Insurance is the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another in exchange for payment.

insurance n 1: promise of reimbursement in the case of loss; paid to people or companies so concerned about hazards that they have made prepayments to an insurance company 2: written contract or certificate of insurance; "you should have read the small print on your policy" [syn: {policy}, {insurance policy}] 3: protection against future loss [syn: {indemnity}]

73 Moby Thesaurus words for "insurance": accident insurance, actuary, annuity, assurance, aviation insurance, bail bond, bond, business life insurance, casualty insurance, certificate of insurance, court bond, cover, credit insurance, credit life insurance, deductible, endowment insurance, family maintenance policy, fidelity bond, fidelity insurance, flood insurance, forearming, forehandedness, foresight, foresightedness, forethought, forethoughtfulness, fraternal insurance, government insurance, guarantee, guaranty, health insurance, indemnification, indemnity, industrial life insurance, insurance agent, insurance broker, insurance company, insurance man, insurance policy, interinsurance, liability insurance, license bond, limited payment insurance, major medical insurance, malpractice insurance, marine insurance, measures, mutual company, ocean marine insurance, permit bond, policy, precaution, precautions, precautiousness, preventive measure, protection, providence, provision, robbery insurance, safeguard, security, social security, steps, steps and measures, stock company, stocks and bonds, surety, term insurance, theft insurance, tie, underwriter, warrant, warranty

Insurance \In*sur"ance\, n. [From {Insure}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of insuring, or assuring, against loss or damage by a contingent event; a contract whereby, for a stipulated consideration, called premium, one party undertakes to indemnify or guarantee another against loss by certain specified risks. Cf. {Assurance}, n., 6. [1913 Webster] Note: The person who undertakes to pay in case of loss is termed the insurer; the danger against which he undertakes, the risk; the person protected, the insured; the sum which he pays for the protection, the premium; and the contract itself, when reduced to form, the policy. --Johnson's Cyc. [1913 Webster] 2. The premium paid for insuring property or life. [1913 Webster] 3. The sum for which life or property is insured. [1913 Webster] 4. A guaranty, security, or pledge; assurance. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The most acceptable insurance of the divine protection. --Mickle. [1913 Webster] 5. Hence: Any means of assuring against loss; a precaution; as, we always use our seat belts as insurance against injury. [PJC] {Accident insurance}, insurance against pecuniary loss by reason of accident to the person. {Endowment insurance} or {Endowment assurance}, a combination of life insurance and investment such that if the person upon whose life a risk is taken dies before a certain specified time the insurance becomes due at once, and if he survives, it becomes due at the time specified. Also called {whole life insurance}. {Fire insurance}. See under {Fire}. {Insurance broker}, a broker or agent who effects insurance. {Insurance company}, a company or corporation whose business it is to insure against loss, damage, or death. {Insurance policy}, a certificate of insurance; the document containing the contract made by an insurance company with a person whose property or life is insured. {Life insurance}. See under {Life}. [1913 Webster]

INSURANCE, n. An ingenious modern game of chance in which the player is permitted to enjoy the comfortable conviction that he is beating the man who keeps the table. INSURANCE AGENT: My dear sir, that is a fine house -- pray let me insure it. HOUSE OWNER: With pleasure. Please make the annual premium so low that by the time when, according to the tables of your actuary, it will probably be destroyed by fire I will have paid you considerably less than the face of the policy. INSURANCE AGENT: O dear, no -- we could not afford to do that. We must fix the premium so that you will have paid more. HOUSE OWNER: How, then, can _I_ afford _that_? INSURANCE AGENT: Why, your house may burn down at any time. There was Smith's house, for example, which -- HOUSE OWNER: Spare me -- there were Brown's house, on the contrary, and Jones's house, and Robinson's house, which -- INSURANCE AGENT: Spare _me_! HOUSE OWNER: Let us understand each other. You want me to pay you money on the supposition that something will occur previously to the time set by yourself for its occurrence. In other words, you expect me to bet that my house will not last so long as you say that it will probably last. INSURANCE AGENT: But if your house burns without insurance it will be a total loss. HOUSE OWNER: Beg your pardon -- by your own actuary's tables I shall probably have saved, when it burns, all the premiums I would otherwise have paid to you -- amounting to more than the face of the policy they would have bought. But suppose it to burn, uninsured, before the time upon which your figures are based. If I could not afford that, how could you if it were insured? INSURANCE AGENT: O, we should make ourselves whole from our luckier ventures with other clients. Virtually, they pay your loss. HOUSE OWNER: And virtually, then, don't I help to pay their losses? Are not their houses as likely as mine to burn before they have paid you as much as you must pay them? The case stands this way: you expect to take more money from your clients than you pay to them, do you not? INSURANCE AGENT: Certainly; if we did not -- HOUSE OWNER: I would not trust you with my money. Very well then. If it is _certain_, with reference to the whole body of your clients, that they lose money on you it is _probable_, with reference to any one of them, that _he_ will. It is these individual probabilities that make the aggregate certainty. INSURANCE AGENT: I will not deny it -- but look at the figures in this pamph -- HOUSE OWNER: Heaven forbid! INSURANCE AGENT: You spoke of saving the premiums which you would otherwise pay to me. Will you not be more likely to squander them? We offer you an incentive to thrift. HOUSE OWNER: The willingness of A to take care of B's money is not peculiar to insurance, but as a charitable institution you command esteem. Deign to accept its expression from a Deserving Object.

Data Sources:

  • assurance: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • assurance: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • assurance: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • assurance: Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
  • insurance: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • insurance: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • insurance: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • insurance: THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY ((C)1911 Released April 15 1993)

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