Aeroplane and Aircraft

Aeroplane

A fixed wing aircraft is an aircraft capable of flight using wings that generate lift due to the vehicle's forward airspeed and the shape of the wings.

aeroplane n : an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets; "the flight was delayed due to trouble with the airplane" [syn: {airplane}, {plane}]

121 Moby Thesaurus words for "aeroplane": adjustable propeller, afterburner, aileron, air controls, air scoop, aircraft, airlift, airplane, airscrew, astrodome, avion, balloon, bay, be airborne, beaching gear, blister, body, bomb bay, bonnet, bow, brace wire, bubble, bubble canopy, bubble hood, bucket seat, cabin, canopy, cat strip, chassis, chin, coaxial propellers, cockpit, coke-bottle fuselage, control surface, control wires, cowl, crew compartment, cruise, deck, dihedral, dorsal airdome, drift, dual controls, ejection seat, ejector, elevator, elevon, ferry, fin, finger patch, flap, flit, float, fly, flying machine, fuel injector, fuselage, gas-shaft hood, glide, gore, gull wing, gun mount, hatch, heavier-than-air craft, hood, hop, hover, hydroplane, instruments, jackstay, jet, jet pipe, keel, kite, laminar-flow system, landing gear, launching gear, launching tube, leading edge, longeron, nacelle, navigate, nose, pants, parasol wing, plane, pod, pontoon, prop, propeller, rudder, rudder bar, sail, sailplane, seaplane, ship, ski landing gear, slitwing, soar, spinner, spoiler, spray strip, stabilizator, stabilizer, stay, stick, stick control, stressed skin, strut, tail, tail plane, tail skid, take the air, take wing, truss, turret, undercarriage, volplane, wheel parts, wing, wing radiator

aeroplane \aer"*o*plane`\ aeroplane \a"["e]r*o*plane`\, n. [a["e]ro- + plane.] (A["e]ronautics) 1. A light rigid plane used in a["e]rial navigation to oppose sudden upward or downward movement in the air, as in gliding machines; specif., such a plane slightly inclined and driven forward as a lifting device in some flying machines. Also called {airfoil}. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 2. hence, a heavier-than-air flying machine using such a device to provide lift. In a modern aeroplane, the airfoils are called the {wings}, and most of the lift is derived from these surfaces. In contrast to helicopters, the wings are fixed to the passenger compartment (airframe) and do not move relative to the frame; thus such a machine is called a {fixed-wing aircraft}. These machines are called monoplanes, biplanes, triplanes, or quadruplanes, according to the number of main supporting planes (wings) used in their construction. After 1940 few planes with more than one airfoil were constructed, and these are used by hobbyists or for special purposes. Being heavier than air they depend for their levitation on motion imparted by the thrust from either propellers driven by an engine, or, in a jet plane, by the reaction from a high-velocity stream of gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. They start from the ground by a run on small wheels or runners, and are guided by a steering apparatus consisting of horizontal and vertical movable planes, which usually form part of the wings or tail. There are many varieties of form and construction, which in some cases are known by the names of their inventors. In U.S., an aeroplane is usually called an {airplane} or {plane}. [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

aeroplane \aer"*o*plane`\ aeroplane \a"["e]r*o*plane`\, n. [a["e]ro- + plane.] (A["e]ronautics) 1. A light rigid plane used in a["e]rial navigation to oppose sudden upward or downward movement in the air, as in gliding machines; specif., such a plane slightly inclined and driven forward as a lifting device in some flying machines. Also called {airfoil}. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 2. hence, a heavier-than-air flying machine using such a device to provide lift. In a modern aeroplane, the airfoils are called the {wings}, and most of the lift is derived from these surfaces. In contrast to helicopters, the wings are fixed to the passenger compartment (airframe) and do not move relative to the frame; thus such a machine is called a {fixed-wing aircraft}. These machines are called monoplanes, biplanes, triplanes, or quadruplanes, according to the number of main supporting planes (wings) used in their construction. After 1940 few planes with more than one airfoil were constructed, and these are used by hobbyists or for special purposes. Being heavier than air they depend for their levitation on motion imparted by the thrust from either propellers driven by an engine, or, in a jet plane, by the reaction from a high-velocity stream of gases expelled rearward from a jet engine. They start from the ground by a run on small wheels or runners, and are guided by a steering apparatus consisting of horizontal and vertical movable planes, which usually form part of the wings or tail. There are many varieties of form and construction, which in some cases are known by the names of their inventors. In U.S., an aeroplane is usually called an {airplane} or {plane}. [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Aircraft

An aircraft is a vehicle that is able to fly by gaining support from the air, or, in general, the atmosphere of a planet.

aircraft n : a vehicle that can fly

Aircraft \Air"craft`\, n. sing. & pl. Any vehicle, such as an airplane, helicopter, balloon, etc., for floating in, or flying through, the air. [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC]

Data Sources:

  • aeroplane: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • aeroplane: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0
  • aeroplane: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • aeroplane: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
  • aircraft: WordNet (r) 2.0
  • aircraft: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44

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